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Should Divorce Be Your New Years Resolution? Marrison Family Law for Legal Help

With the holidays almost over, the thought of a divorce is something you've likely tucked away considering the time frame. However, statistics continually show divorces occur more often during the beginning of a new year. Huffington Post scoped out this statistic years ago, showing how the holidays can often wreak havoc on relationships.

It's no surprise that this is a trend when the holidays means being together more often than any other time with the added weight of financial and public pressures. The holidays also bring the most stress, sometimes taking an already shaky marriage to the edge.

If you're planning a divorce in 2018, Marrison Family Law in Colorado Springs can help you through it all with compassion and experience.

Are You Truly Unhappy with Your Marriage?

While the holidays often bring annoyances to the surface, you should be able to tell if you're in an incompatible marriage by looking back to before the holidays, especially if you don't regularly spend time together. However, the holidays can bring up moments that had previously been unrecognizable and can help you identify the next steps for your relationship.

You may realize that prior to the holidays, you only spend time with your spouse out of obligation to your career or your children. You may discover that your marriage has become so routine, that you just go through the motions without really realizing you're not happy.

During the holidays, you have a good litmus test to see if your marriage is truly in trouble. Watch out for a few specific things you'll likely encounter when you're together, alone, or with family.

Some of the Signs of Marriage Troubles

One of the most prominent signs of a deteriorating marriage is not having anything to say to one another. Holiday time is going to give you plenty of incentive to talk, whether in family settings or when spending time together planning activities. Not having anything to say suggests that you've lost interest in one another and your spouse's feelings. While communication should always be open rather than closed, the holidays offer several opportunities to bridge that gap, and if the season doesn’t naturally create discussion, there may be cause for concern.

Lack of engagement is always a major sign. Many people call this being with each other, but not really being with each other. Appreciating each other in a holiday setting is a natural benefit of the season, so if you discover that the holiday spirit has no impact on the way you interact with your spouse, it may be time for you to evaluate the source.

Some other signs to look out for:

  • You're finding yourself preoccupied with other people's needs and problems rather than your spouse's.
  • There isn't any intimacy when you're alone together.
  • You no longer fight. No longer fighting means communication is beyond the point of returning.
  • General unhappiness for several years, including feeling nostalgic at how great your marriage once was rather than now.

Did the End of the Year Make Everything Worse?

Things might come to a head during the holidays when you notice all of the above signs and more, but the holiday spirit may be interjecting as a convenient excuse to avoid the conflict. Prolonging your steps to restore peace in your household is not the best approach, and we are here to guide your through the challenge of confronting the issues in your relationship.

When you have children, things become even more contentious, and it's important to think first about the welfare of your kids. Talking about a divorce to your kids during the holidays is extremely challenging, and it's why so many couples wait to divorce until after the holidays end.

A divorce lawyer who helps bring true compassion to couples facing divorce, including proper child custody and support issues, is your answer for starting the new year on a positive note to regain fulfillment in your household.

Marrison Family Law Brings Compassion to Divorcing Families

Those of you who live in Colorado Springs, Colorado can turn to Marrison Family Law to bring true expertise and compassion toward your divorce.

Even if you've already been served divorce papers, the Marrison legal team is going to help you make the best possible decisions. They'll start with two of the most important: How you'll divide your property, and how you'll raise your kids after the divorce is final. Your legal team helps you deal with child support/custody issues through mediation for a potentially amicable agreement.

Visit Marrison Family Law's website to learn more about divorce law and to get immediate help. We cover the Pueblo area as well as Colorado Springs and are your source for compassionate support.

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Effects of Divorce on Children

Monday, 21 March 2016

Effects of Divorce on Children

There is no book or secret recipe that can predict how your children will respond to you and your partner separating.  Every child is different and deals with their emotions in their own way.  School-age children understand that divorce means their mom and dad are not going to live together anymore.  Most of them have friends whose parents are divorced and may have heard phrases such as "I'm going to my dad's house this weekend."   However, the first thing that comes to most children's mind when they hear the word divorce is "What about me?" 

When considering the effects of divorce on children, remember that kids will be anxious about things like moving or changing schools.  Younger kids will worry about the logistics of their toys.  How will they still get to play with them all?  What about the pets?  They'll have many detailed questions for you, such as if you still love their mom or dad, and first and foremost, if you still love them.  You need to be prepared with comforting answers, and most importantly, you need to reassure them that are loved and will be cared for, no matter what.

shared parenting

Many children show signs of regression and insecurity, both at home and at school.  Some effects of divorce on children include mood shifts, causing children to become angry, depressed, mischievous, clingy, or uncooperative.  During this difficult time, your children will require additional attention and affection.  The most amicable divorces can still create an earth-shattering change for any child, and kids find change to be very scary, especially one dealing with something as fundamental as their parents.  They rely on routines, normalcy.  Some will be openly sad or mad at you, while others may act like they don't care.

However, don’t get discouraged.  School-age kids can be surprisingly resilient and malleable. How you explain the divorce to them will make a significant difference in how they can cope with it.  Make sure you speak to them before, during, and after it happens.  Remember that these are typical effects of divorce on children and what they need most from you right now is patience, reassurance, and consistency in the everyday routines they know. While this time will be difficult for you, remember that your children will be hurting as well. Be their rock, and in return, they may end up being the same to you.

Your children will be deeply affected by this change. Make sure you stay in tune with their needs and give them the love they will need. And if you need assistance in setting up your Child Visitation, contact the professionals at Marrison Family Law.

 

 

There is no book or secret recipe that can predict how your children will respond to you and your partner separating.  Every child is different and deals with their emotions in their own way.  School-age children understand that divorce means their mom and dad are not going to live together anymore.  Most of them have friends whose parents are divorced and may have heard phrases such as "I'm going to my dad's house this weekend."   However, the first thing that comes to most children's mind when they hear the word divorce is "What about me?" 

 

When considering the effects of divorce on children, remember that kids will be anxious about things like moving or changing schools.  Younger kids will worry about the logistics of their toys.  How will they still get to play with them all?  What about the pets?  They'll have many detailed questions for you, such as if you still love their mom or dad, and first and foremost, if you still love them.  You need to be prepared with comforting answers, and most importantly, you need to reassure them that are loved and will be cared for, no matter what.

 

Many children show signs of regression and insecurity, both at home and at school.  Some effects of divorce on children include mood shifts, causing children to become angry, depressed, mischievous, clingy, or uncooperative.  During this difficult time, your children will require additional attention and affection.  The most amicable divorces can still create an earth-shattering change for any child, and kids find change to be very scary, especially one dealing with something as fundamental as their parents.  They rely on routines, normalcy.  Some will be openly sad or mad at you, while others may act like they don't care.

 

However, don’t get discouraged.  School-age kids can be surprisingly resilient and malleable. How you explain the divorce to them will make a significant difference in how they can cope with it.  Make sure you speak to them before, during, and after it happens.  Remember that these are typical effects of divorce on children and what they need most from you right now is patience, reassurance, and consistency in the everyday routines they know. While this time will be difficult for you, remember that your children will be hurting as well. Be their rock, and in return, they may end up being the same to you.

 

Your children will be deeply affected by this change. Make sure you stay in tune with their needs and give them the love they will need. And if you need assistance in setting up your Child Visitation, contact the professionals at Marrison Family Law.

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How to Tell Children About Divorce

Thursday, 10 March 2016

How to Tell Children About Divorce

Deciding to file for divorce is challenging; letting your children know is an entirely different kind of difficult. You want to be kind but firm, compassionate yet resilient. Read the tips below to learn some important information when talking to your kids about divorce.

Choose your timing.  Do not start talking to your kids until you know for sure that you are separating.  The uncertainty of hearing "Mom and dad are thinking about getting divorced" will create unnecessary stress for both you and your children.  Although there is never an "ideal" time, there are definitely bad times to deliver the news. When planning how to tell your children about divorce, avoid difficult or rushed times such as right before you head off to work and have no time to answer questions, school days, just before bed, or just before your child goes into their soccer practice.  You need to pick a time where both you and your partner can sit down together and either answer the questions that will come or dry the tears and be there for them.  

Telling your child together is highly recommended.  Regardless of your differences, try to agree on what you are going to tell your kids for their own sake.  Don't confuse them with contradicting stories.  By acting as a team when you when deciding how to tell your children about divorce, you will preserve your children's sense of trust in both of you. 

Keep it simple.  Use age appropriate terms.  When talking to your kids about divorce, limit the initial explanation to no more than a few key sentences.  Try deciding how the visitation days will work and where you will live before you speak to your children so that they are comforted by the fact that you two are handling this and have it figured out.  Most children will want to know that they will still see both parents and there is a plan in place, a new routine to come.  If your child has witnessed you two fighting, acknowledge that fact and explain that you're doing what's best for them and the family. 

Most importantly when planning how to tell your children about divorce is to reassure them that your separation is not their fault.  Children often blame themselves for the breakup.  They may think the change is happening because they didn't listen well enough, didn't clean their room, or didn't do well in school.  Comfort them by saying that divorce is an adult decision and is never a child's fault. Avoid the blame game.  Blaming your spouse for the divorce and arguing in front of your child will only make them feel as though they need to pick a side.  Your children look up to both of you; keep it that way by respecting each other.


While nothing you will be looking forward to, by being clear and respectful while talking to your kids about divorce, you can save future headaches and potentially become closer with your children. And if you need assistance with child custody, contact our Child Custody Lawyers today.

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When couples consider getting divorced, they often have no idea how difficult the process can be.  This is particularly true when there are children involved.  If you are fighting for custody of your children, then a Colorado Springs child custody lawyer can help.  Meanwhile, follow these tips for the most successful outcome.

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When we hear the term “terminate parental rights”, it usually refers to one of two things.  In the case of an adoption, parents will need to terminate their parental rights in order for the adoption to become legal.  But in criminal cases, where parents are charged with child abuse or neglect, they may lose their parental rights involuntarily. 

A court-imposed termination of parental rights is not necessary for parents who choose to forego visitation and live apart from their children.  Under most circumstances, the court would only get involved in parental rights issues when a parent becomes a danger to his or her child. 

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Grandparents' Rights In Colorado

Thursday, 11 June 2015

There’s no doubt that grandparents play an increasingly important role in the life of a child. In fact, one recent study from the University of Chicago and the National Institute on Aging says that some 60 percent of grandparents served as caregivers to grandchildren over a ten year period.

It’s no wonder that the number of involved grandparents would make them want to fight for visitation rights after their children get divorced.

As a grandparent, you should know your rights for visitation and custody.

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When flashpoint issues that can pit one parent against another during a divorce or post-dissolution matter come up, there are few more explosive topics than educating the children. And when homeschooling is mentioned, the entire room, just for one minute, may even go quiet.

At its best, homeschooling can offer parents a focused and dedicated opportunity to allow children to thrive, grow and learn outside of a public school environment. Done wrong, homeschooling can lead to children who don’t get enough opportunities to interact with other children, spend too much time in front of computers, and may be taught by a parent who often means well but doesn’t have the tools to do it right.

Either way, the best way to confront the issue of how courts in Colorado address homeschooling is information, and probably a long conversation with a qualified family law attorney.

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There is a time when the inescapable moment arrives, when a married couple realizes they’ve given it all they have, but just can’t stay together.

Then, both spouses wake up and realize that all that is left is trying to figure out how they’re going to divide the houses, the cars, the bank accounts and all the other things they’ve accumulated. In some cases, that’s another wrenching chapter in a very, very long story.

To get the most reliable information, calling a trustworthy Colorado Springs divorce attorney early can help to separate the reality from the myth. When people finally stop listening to the whispers of their friends and relatives, that’s usually when truth surfaces, which sometimes can be much different than people think, but a huge relief to hear nonetheless.

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Family law attorneys may spend most of their time dealing with divorce, child custody and support issues, but parental rights are another area that falls into their domain.  In addition to giving parents physical rights to spend time with a child, parental rights also include the right to decide on the type of education, religion, health care and morals a child should have.  Beyond that, these rights also come with responsibilities, which include providing the children with clothing, food and shelter and all necessary child support, healthcare, etc.

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Marital Separation Agreements Q&A

Wednesday, 29 April 2015

Marital separation agreements are a good arrangement for some. Here are some common questions we are asked by our clients.

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MPatMarrisonFor over a quarter century, we have helped people during what is often the darkest time in their lives. Divorce is not easy even under the best of circumstances. For most people, family is central. Having something go wrong in the family can have a ripple effect that extends beyond the home and into other areas.

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